Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Quality Driveway Construction

Quality Driveway Construction

The following are recommendations for creating a quality driveway installation.

1. Planning and Preparation

* Concrete must be cast on a prepared subgrade that is uniform in soil composition and compaction.
* For drainage, the grade must be sloped a minimum of 1/8th inch per foot from all existing structures
* Stake formwork securely providing a minimum slab depth of 4 inches.
* Dampen the subgrade and formwork prior to placement (particularly during summer construction).

2. Mix Design Recommendations

The mix design recommended for driveway construction must meet the following requirements:

* Compressive strength: 4000 psi minimum @ 28 days (refer to local code requirements)
* Air Content: 6.5 +/- 1.5%
* Aggregates: coarse aggregates meeting MDOT 6AA (ASTM C33, 4S) classification
* Slump: 4 +/- 1 inch

3. Placing and Finishing Guidelines

To construct a durable wearing surface, the sequence for placing and finishing is as follows:

* Screeding or strike-off
* Floating, followed by a waiting period for the water sheen (bleed water) to dissipate
* Edging and jointing
* Brooming (to provide a non-slip surface)
* Do not finish the surface while bleed water is present.
* Do not ‘bless” the surface with water to facilitate finishing.
* Do not steel trowel the surface…wood/magnesium floats are recommended.
* Steel trowelling can entrap bleedwater resulting in a non-durable surface
* Discharge from the mixer must be completed within 90 minutes of batching of concrete.
* Prolonged mixing or delayed placement will adversely affect the quality of the concrete with regards to air content and compressive strength.
* Control joints must be spaced at intervals not exceeding 10 feet with a minimum depth of cut equal to ¼ the slab thickness. A centerline control joint is required for driveways greater than 12 feet in width.
* Where new construction abuts existing structures (i.e. garage floors, brick veneer walls, fence posts, etc.) an isolation joint extending the full depth of the concrete slab is required.

4. Curing Requirements

* Following placement, the driveway must be cured to attain the strength and durability potential of the concrete.
* From mid-April to mid-September, cure the concrete incorporating one of the following methods:
* Apply a membrane curing compound according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
* 7 day continuous water soaking
* Saturated burlap with polyethylene cover (secured in place)
* From mid-September to mid-April, employ a waterproof cover (i.e. insulating blankets) maintaining the curing temperature above 55°F for a minimum of 7 days.
* Cold weather concreting practices must be observed for concrete placed after November 1st.

5. Homeowner Care

* Do not drive on the ‘new’ concrete for at least 7 days.
* Do not allow water to drain beneath the slab ….. settlement cracks may develop.
* Do not allow snow and ice to accumulate the first winter ….. keep the driveway shoveled off.
* Do not apply deicing chemicals for snow and ice removal the first winter. As an alternative, sand can be used for traction.
* WARNING: Never use deicers containing ammonium sulfate or ammonium nitrate (i.e. fertilizers). Such products are known to aggressively attack concrete.
* Michigan is classified as a severe weathering region. Therefore, a sealer must be applied approximately 30 days following placement provided that the surface is dry and ambient temperatures are above 55°F.
* Contact your local Ready Mix producer (or building supply store) to purchase a concrete sealer.
* Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for sealer application.
* Re-application of the sealer is generally required every 2 years.

This information used by permission of the Michigan Concrete Association
www.miconcrete.org

Monday, March 30, 2009

concrete contractor|wall|basement|driveway|patio|slab|garage floor|pole barn floor|michigan|indiana




Jeff Todd Concrete LLC

Quality you can stand on – Free estimates………

Serving Michigan & indiana

Company Address:

Jeff Todd Concrete LLC

19690 S River Rd

Three Rivers, MI 49093

Email: info@concrete-contractor.net

Telephone: 269-278-1910 Cell 269-651-5941

Jeff Todd Concrete LLC located in Three Rivers Michigan has the ability and experience to provide you with the finished concrete product for your projects, that you expect at a very competitive price.

Jeff Todd’s background brings you experience, talent and dedication to quality you expect and demand of your concrete contractor.

We service residential, commercial and industrial concrete construction. Everyone at Jeff Todd Concrete LLc is committed to serving every prospective client and every customer with the highest degree of service, quality and workmanship.

Company Services

driveway, sidewalk, patio, curbs & gutters, retaining walls, handicap ramps, foundations, machine slabs, loading docks and ramps, parking lots, porch, pool decks, sea wall, decorative concrete, exposed aggregate, colored concrete, garage floor, pole barn floor, mobile home slab & more………..

Concrete contractor serving three rivers, schoolcraft, vicksburg, marcellus, michigan, indiana and more.....

Friday, January 30, 2009

Get Stone, Sand, Topsoil Delivered Economically

We have the perfect machine for placing material in those tough to reach areas.....

The Stone Slinger is the most cost effective way to accurately place material on your job site. No more dumping and handling the material a second time. The Stone Slinger virtually eliminates the need for skid steers, excavator, and wheelbarrows. It's unique double conveying system "slings" the material right in place off the truck.

The Stone Slinger allows you to utilize its all wheel drive and remote control functions. Now STONE|SAND|TOP SOIL|MULCH can be placed right where you want it, the first time!

The Stone Slinger can get into the most difficult job sites. You can minimize your work and spend your time in some other demanding aspects of the project saving you time and money! For your project, big or small - give us a call!

One operator can unload and spread tons of STONE|SAND|TOP SOIL|MULCH in minutes - up to 100 feet from the truck. Difficult access areas are no challenge for the Stone Slinger.

Cost Savings:

Depending on the specific situation, the Stone Slinger can save you 40% to 50% when placing materials. No longer will you have the added costs of machines and extra men on location to move it manually. All it generally takes is one man only minutes to finish grade the material.



Bogen Concrete has been serving the construction industry since 1983. We are a locally owned and operated business delivering redi-mix concrete and now STONE|SAND|TOP SOIL|MULCH, commited to provide prompt and reliable service, at competitive prices. Even though we are able to tackle large commercial and residential projects, we still pride ourselves in being able to give personal and courteous service to customers needing less than a truck load.

Driveway Construction Tips for a Quality Driveway

Quality Driveway Construction

The following are recommendations for creating a quality driveway installation.

1. Planning and Preparation

* Concrete must be cast on a prepared subgrade that is uniform in soil composition and compaction.
* For drainage, the grade must be sloped a minimum of 1/8th inch per foot from all existing structures
* Stake formwork securely providing a minimum slab depth of 4 inches.
* Dampen the subgrade and formwork prior to placement (particularly during summer construction).

2. Mix Design Recommendations

The mix design recommended for driveway construction must meet the following requirements:

* Compressive strength: 4000 psi minimum @ 28 days (refer to local code requirements)
* Air Content: 6.5 +/- 1.5%
* Aggregates: coarse aggregates meeting MDOT 6AA (ASTM C33, 4S) classification
* Slump: 4 +/- 1 inch

3. Placing and Finishing Guidelines

To construct a durable wearing surface, the sequence for placing and finishing is as follows:

* Screeding or strike-off
* Floating, followed by a waiting period for the water sheen (bleed water) to dissipate
* Edging and jointing
* Brooming (to provide a non-slip surface)
* Do not finish the surface while bleed water is present.
* Do not 'bless" the surface with water to facilitate finishing.
* Do not steel trowel the surface…wood/magnesium floats are recommended.
* Steel trowelling can entrap bleedwater resulting in a non-durable surface
* Discharge from the mixer must be completed within 90 minutes of batching of concrete.
* Prolonged mixing or delayed placement will adversely affect the quality of the concrete with regards to air content and compressive strength.
* Control joints must be spaced at intervals not exceeding 10 feet with a minimum depth of cut equal to ¼ the slab thickness. A centerline control joint is required for driveways greater than 12 feet in width.
* Where new construction abuts existing structures (i.e. garage floors, brick veneer walls, fence posts, etc.) an isolation joint extending the full depth of the concrete slab is required.

4. Curing Requirements

* Following placement, the driveway must be cured to attain the strength and durability potential of the concrete.
* From mid-April to mid-September, cure the concrete incorporating one of the following methods:
* Apply a membrane curing compound according to the manufacturer's instructions.
* 7 day continuous water soaking
* Saturated burlap with polyethylene cover (secured in place)
* From mid-September to mid-April, employ a waterproof cover (i.e. insulating blankets) maintaining the curing temperature above 55°F for a minimum of 7 days.
* Cold weather concreting practices must be observed for concrete placed after November 1st.

5. Homeowner Care

* Do not drive on the 'new' concrete for at least 7 days.
* Do not allow water to drain beneath the slab ….. settlement cracks may develop.
* Do not allow snow and ice to accumulate the first winter ….. keep the driveway shoveled off.
* Do not apply deicing chemicals for snow and ice removal the first winter. As an alternative, sand can be used for traction.
* WARNING: Never use deicers containing ammonium sulfate or ammonium nitrate (i.e. fertilizers). Such products are known to aggressively attack concrete.
* Michigan is classified as a severe weathering region. Therefore, a sealer must be applied approximately 30 days following placement provided that the surface is dry and ambient temperatures are above 55°F.
* Contact your local Ready Mix producer (or building supply store) to purchase a concrete sealer.
* Follow the manufacturer's instructions for sealer application.
* Re-application of the sealer is generally required every 2 years.

This information used by permission of the Michigan Concrete Association
www.miconcrete.org

Concrete Care Tips For Homeowners

Homeowner Care of Concrete

Although concrete is one of the most durable construction products, it endures the harshest elements of our climate. Other wearing surfaces such as carpets and wood floors often have protective products applied (i.e. stain resistors and sealers) to extend their service life and durability while facilitating easier maintenance. To provide the same protection to your concrete driveway, it is recommended that it be treated with a protective sealer. By following the guidelines outlined in this brochure, your driveway will be durable and serviceable for many years to come.

Curing
Prior to applying a protective sealer, your driveway must be cured to attain the strength and durability potential of the concrete. Curing maintains the concrete at satisfactory moisture and temperature conditions to allow hydration to continue. Curing should commence following placement and extend a minimum of 7 days.

Any one of the following methods can be used:

* Spray on curing compound (according ASTM C309).
* Polyethylene cover.
* Seven day continuous water cure.
* Saturated burlap with polyethylene cover.

Of the methods mentioned, the spray on curing compound provides the most cost effective approach towards curing particularly during summer concrete construction.

Sealing
Once your driveway is cured and given an opportunity to air dry (approximately 1 month), it is now ready to be sealed. A protective sealer minimizes moisture and deicing salt penetration into the surface of the concrete. Concrete surfaces must be sealed when ambient temperatures are favorable and certainly before the onset of winter. Depending on the type of sealer, regular maintenance may be required. Contact you local ready mix producer for sealing products available in you area.

Care and Maintenance
Although concrete is an extremely durable product, the following care and maintenance guidelines will add to the value of your investment:

1. Do not apply deicing chemicals for snow and ice removal during the first winter. To provide traction, sand is recommended.
2. Never apply deicers containing ammonium sulphate or ammonium nitrate. These products may be packaged and sold as deicers, but aggressively attack and deteriorate concrete surfaces.
3. For stain removal, do not use harsh acids. Use a product specifically designed for the stain in question and for use on concrete.
4. Keep concrete clean of snow and ice at all times.


This information used by permission of the Michigan Concrete Association
www.miconcrete.org

ICF Insulating Concrete Forms For Houses

Insulating Concrete Form Homes

Homes constructed with Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs) walls are quiet, high quality, safe, energy efficient, durable, and cost efficient. But what exactly is an Insulating Concrete Form?

In a Nutshell

ICFs are forms into which concrete is poured to create the wall construction in a concrete structure. The forms stay in place as a permanent part of the wall and provide insulation, hinder sound, air and moisture transmission, and serve as the backer for any interior and exterior finishes imaginable.
How are ICFs Made?

ICFs are plastic foams filled with thousands of tiny holes. The foams are produced by “frothing-up” plastics while molten, then cooling them. There are many different types and brands of these forms, each created by varying ingredients and manufacturing methods. The ICFs sold in North America are made either of expanded polystyrene (EPS), extruded polystyrene (XPS) or a cement-foam composite.

1. EPS-Cement Composites
Pure Foams
2. Polyurethanes
Polystyrenes
3. Expanded Polystyrenes (EPS)
4. Extruded Polystyrenes (XPS)
Type of ICF How It’s Made Characteristics
1 EPS-Cement Composite Formed from a mixture of portland cement and loose EPS beads - slightly lower insulating value
- very strong
- durable
- heavier, and require slightly more effort to cut and shape
2 Polyurethane Formed when an isocyanate and a polyol are mixed and react with one another. - more expensive than EPS and XPS
- highest insulating value
- comparable strength
- molded form only
3 EPS Made from polystyrene. Begins as small plastic beads that are expanded and fused together (similar to disposable, white foam coffee cups). - least expensive
- insulates well
- resistant to air and moisture infiltration
- moderately strong
- available in molded or sheet form
4 XPS Made from polystyrene. Begins as a continuous mass of molten material (similar to yellow foam trays used in meat department at the grocery store). - more expensive than EPS
- 25% higher insulating value than EPS
- greater resistance to water
- higher strength
- sheet form only

Information courtesy of the Portland Cement Association.

Although each type of ICF has a unique set of properties, all types create excellent houses. ICFs are extremely safe for you and your family; they retard flame, are nontoxic, give off no dangerous emissions, and are highly inert. So for superior quality and safety, build your home of concrete.

This information used by permission of the Michigan Concrete Association www.miconcrete.org

Cold Weather Concrete Tips

Cold Weather Concrete

Residential Concreting:"The COLD Facts"

With the arrival of fall and cooler temperatures, the placement of residential flatwork can continue, provided that the principles of "Cold Weather Concreting" are followed. By definition (ACI 306), cold weather conditions exist when "…for more than 3 consecutive days, the average daily temperature is less than 40°F AND the air temperature is not greater than 50°F for more than one-half of any 24 hr. period."

ACCELERATED EARLY STRENGTH GAIN

To overcome delayed strength and initial set development associated with cold weather conditions, one or a combination of the following mix adjustments are recommended:

* Substituting Type I with Type III cement
* Addition of calcium chloride admixtures
* Addition of non-chloride accelerators
* Increasing the Type I cement content by 100-200 lbs.

PLACEMENT GUIDELINES

* Do not place concrete on a frozen subgrade; upon thawing, uneven settlement and cracking are likely to occur.
* The minimum concrete temperature, as placed and maintained, must exceed 55°F. . . however, caution should be exercised with concrete temperatures above 75°F.
* Appropriate curing and cold weather protection must be incorporated to prevent the concrete from freezing.

CURING AND COLD WEATHER PROTECTION

To develop the strength, durability and permeability potential of the concrete, curing and protection during cold weather conditions are essential. The following guidelines are recommended upon placement:

* The curing period must extend a minimum of 7 days (maintaining the 55°F temperature).
* Do not seal freshly placed concrete. Sealing retains water in the concrete thereby keeping it saturated during freeze/thaw conditions.
* Cold weather protection is best provided through insulating blankets or loose straw (minimum 12 inches deep) sandwiched between a waterproof cover e.g. polyethylene.

MIX DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS

A minimum specified compressive strength of 4000 psi at 28 days is required for exterior flatwork exposed to cyclic freezing and thawing. The slump, as placed, should not exceed 5 inches with the exception of those mixes incorporating mid or high range plasticizers. The recommended air content is 6.5 ±1.5%.

OWNER CARE - FIRST WINTER

* Deicing salts must not be applied…for traction, sand is recommended.
* Do not allow snow and ice to accumulate…this maintains the concrete in a saturated condition during freeze-thaw conditions.

This information used by permission of the Michigan Concrete Association www.miconcrete.org